Friday, July 17, 2015

Barbecue Fun on a Stick: Bannock and Corn Dogs - Margaret Ullrich

S’mores have become quite popular for cooking over a campfire.
They’re even selling a boxed kit of graham crackers, marshmallows and some chocolate.

S’mores are delicious and fun to make when the gang’s camping.
But, after a few camp outs, they do become 'same old, same old'.


Bannock is something a little different.
We enjoyed making it when we went camping.
I mixed the dry ingredients at home.
While the fire and sticks were being prepared I made the batter.

Bannock is an easy bread to make.
Not as sweet as a s’more and it goes well with salads and hot dogs.
Dough wrapped around a stick, held over a fire.
Kids love roughing it and holding the dough over the camp fire.

If you’re having a barbecue in the back yard, corn dogs can provide a bit of variety.
They can be prepared in advance and frozen.
Handy to have as a backup in case a few of the kids’ friends invite themselves over.
Hey, the more the merrier!!


Hints:

You need red hot coals to cook the bannock. 

If you are cooking the bread on a stick find sticks long enough so you can keep your distance from the fire.
They should also be thick enough to carry the weight of the dough. 
Skin the bark off the end of the sticks, then temper them over the flames of your camp fire until they are hot to the touch but not burnt. 
This will help the bannock to cook on the inside as well.

When the bread is wrapped around the sticks, find a place above the fire where you can hold your hand for 10 – 15 seconds.
This is the right distance from the fire to cook your bannock.
You want the bread to cook through and not be raw on the inside.
When the bannock is cooked, it will come off the stick easily. 
If it’s difficult to pull off, let it cook for another minute or so.

About the corn dogs…
If you've pre-made and frozen them, fully defrost them before you bake them.


                        Bannock on a Stick

Combine in a medium bowl
1 Cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 Tablespoons sugar
Stir in
1 Tablespoon melted butter or oil
Stir in
1/4 to 3/4 Cup water
You want a dough that is easy to handle. 
Knead for a few minutes.
Set it aside and let the dough rise as you prepare the fire. 

When the coals are hot take a piece of the dough and roll it into a rope between your hands. 
Wrap it around the end of your tempered stick in a spiral.
Press it down as you wrap so it will cling to the stick.
Hold the bannock over the fire and let it cook, rotating it frequently.
The bannock will take about 10 minutes to cook.

                        Baked Bannock 

Preheat the oven to 350º F 
Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil 

Prepare the bannock dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.
Divide the dough into small pieces and flatten into circles about 1 inch thick.
Lay the dough on the baking sheet.
Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until golden brown and cooked through. 

                        Corn Dogs

Cut in half 
7 hot dogs (either chicken or beef)

Have on hand
14 wooden sticks, about 6 inches long
Insert a stick halfway through each halved hot dog

Preheat the oven to 400º F 
Line a cookie sheet with aluminum foil 

Place in a large bowl
1 Cup flour
1 Cup cornmeal
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 Cup dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground mustard powder (NOT prepared mustard), optional

Add and cut in 
6 Tablespoons butter
Mix until the mixture looks like coarse crumbs. 
Stir in 
1/2 Cup milk

Using an ice cream scoop, scoop out the dough. 
Form the dough around each halved hot dog.
Seal both ends and any open areas. 
Place the corn dog on the baking sheet. 
Repeat with the remaining hot dogs.
Bake for 10 minutes.
Flip each corn dog and then bake for another 5 - 10 minutes. 
Serve with mustard or ketchup  

No comments:

Post a Comment