Friday, December 31, 2010

Carmela Soprano's Candy Cane Martini

We made it!!!

Another holiday season has come and gone.

Time for another drink from the Holidays chapter in Carmela's Entertaining with The Sopranos to toast the New Year.

There's a recipe for Rosie's Candy Cane Martini.  
How nice, a way to use up the Christmas candy canes.
Thank you Rosie!


Dip the rims of martini glasses into a bowl of
fresh lime juice
Then into a dish of 
finely crushed candy canes

Mix in an ice-filled cocktail shaker 
5 parts good vodka
1 part peppermint schnapps

Shake and pour into the rimmed glasses.


Would I make the Candy Cane Martini again?
You have to ask?

Happy New Year!!!

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Another Christmas - Being 60 (week 34 - by Margaret Ullrich)

I've just gotten through my 60th Christmas.

Okay... I have to admit I don't remember the first few.  As an infant I must have been dazed by the lights and noise.  
And a few other Christmases - especially the ones during my 50s - kind of came and went.


But, there were other Christmases which, like the ones Scrooge's Ghost of Christmas Past showed him, will always come to mind at this time of year.

They are in my own personal holiday film library, my own It's a Wonderful Life and National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation.


Most of the memorable ones weren't particularly noteworthy.
They weren't markers for special years, like 21 or 50.
I didn't go to any place exotic.
I wasn't doing a 'bucket list' thing.
I didn't receive the Hope diamond.

But the special Christmases had moments that stayed with me.  The memory of them gets triggered by something simple - a bite of a cookie, the scent of a candle, the sight of an old Christmas ornament.

I think it's that way for most people.

Stores do their darndest to make us buy something to make this Christmas special.

Chill.

It already is.

Saturday, December 25, 2010

Some Thoughts

 1. Throw out nonessential numbers - age, weight and height. Let the doctors worry about them. That is why you pay 'them'.

 2. Keep only cheerful friends. 

 3. Keep learning. Learn more about the computer, crafts, gardening, whatever. 'An idle mind is the devil's workshop.'

 4. Enjoy the simple things. 

 5. Laugh often, long and loud. Laugh until you gasp for breath.

 6. Tears happen. Endure, grieve, and move on. The only person who is with you your entire life is yourself. Be ALIVE while you are alive. 

 7. Surround yourself with what you love - family, pets, keepsakes, music, plants, hobbies. Your home is your refuge. 

 8. Cherish your health. If it is good, preserve it. If it is not, improve it. If you can't improve it, get help. 

 9. Don't take guilt trips. Take a trip to the mall or a foreign country, but not to where the guilt is.

10. Tell the people you love that you love them.  Tell them again. 


Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away.

Live life to its fullest each day!
  
Worry about nothing, 
Pray about everything!!

Carmela Soprano's Spiked Egg Nog

Merry Christmas!!!

The kiddies are busy with their new video games and the turkey is almost ready.

Time to have something a little festive with the other adults.

You've earned it.


Found just the thing in the Holidays chapter in Carmela's Entertaining with The Sopranos, Spiked Egg Nog.  

In a large saucepan heat almost to boiling
2 quarts eggnog

Remove from stove and stir in
1 1/4 cups Tia Maria

Pour into punch bowl.
Garnish with grated nutmeg.


Would I make the Spiked Egg Nog again?
You betcha.

Cheers!!!

Thursday, December 23, 2010

Aunt Demi's Baccala, Cod with Capers and Garlic, Maltese Style

Aunt Demi was not going to let Aunt Dina have the last word.
No sir.

She's giving another Maltese sauce.  
With capers.
And more garlic.

This is absolutely it.  

Don't forget.  You have to soak and drain the baccala for a couple of days.
Or use frozen.

Here we go again...

2 pounds of prepared baccala, cut in 4-inch serving pieces
Roll in 
1/2 cup flour
----
In a large skillet heat
1/2 cup olive oil
Brown for 3 minutes 
2 cloves garlic
Fry the fish 4 minutes on both sides.
Sprinkle with 
1/2 teaspoon pepper 
----
Blend together
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 cup warm water
Pour over fish
----
Add
1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves
1 teaspoon washed capers
Cover, simmer 10 minutes until well done. 

Serve very hot.

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Aunt Dina's Baccala Dolce e Agro (Sweet and Sour Cod Sauce)

If you've read my story about the Battle of the Easter Breads, you know that my Aunt Dina is a bit competitive.

She's weighing in with her sweet and sour sauce.
And she gives times.

This is it.  
I'm sick of baccala.

Don't forget.  You have to soak and drain the baccala for a couple of days.
Or buy frozen, for cryin' out loud.

Here goes:

Roll in 
1/2 cup flour
2 pounds of prepared baccala, cut in serving-sized pieces
----
In a large skillet heat
1/2 cup olive oil
Brown for 3 minutes 
1 clove garlic
then remove and discard it.
Fry the fish 5 minutes on both sides.  
----
While the fish is frying, place in a saucepan
1/2 cup wine vinegar
2/3 cup water
2 tablespoons currants 
1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves
1 tablespoon shelled pistachio nuts
Boil slowly 5 minutes
Pour over the fish, cover, simmer 3 minutes. 

Serve very hot with a green salad.

Aunt Betty's Baccala Dolce e Agro (Sweet and Sour Cod)

Got some e mails for more baccala recipes.

Here's another way to cook prepared baccala.
Sweet and Sour Cod.

No, you can't get away from the soaking and water change.


Roll in flour
2 pounds of prepared baccala, cut in serving-sized pieces
----
In a large skillet heat
1/2 cup olive oil
Brown
1 clove garlic
then remove and discard it.
Fry the fish until golden brown.  
Remove to heated platter.
----
While the fish is frying, place in a saucepan
1/2 cup wine vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
1 cup water
2 tablespoons seedless golden raisins
2 tablespoons pine nuts
1 tablespoon fresh mint leaves
Simmer 5 minutes
Pour over the fish and serve at once.

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Christmas Breads: Italian Panettone and German Stollen

According to the old Ukrainian folk saying 
Bread is the head of everything.

Well, duh.

You want to do your best as hostess.
You've invited Italians and Germans.
You want to please everyone.
Time is short.

This recipe will give you a loaf of Panettone and a loaf of Stollen for the time of one.
Trust me.


                        Panettone / Stollen

Grease 1 cookie sheet & 1 deep round pan
Preheat oven to 350º

Heat  to scalding
1 cup milk
1/2 cup butter (or margarine) softened
1/2 cup sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
Let it stand until it is lukewarm.
----
Pour into a warmed mixing bowl
1/2 cup warm water
Add
2 tablespoons active dry yeast
Stir until yeast is dissolved.
Add the milk and butter mixture and stir well.
----
Add
2 large eggs, beaten
2 cups flour
Beat until smooth.
----
Blend in
1/4 cup seedless raisins
1/4 cup citron peel
1/4 cup chopped toasted almonds
1/2 cup diced candied mixed fruit
Dive dough in half.
Place in 2 bowls.

-------------------------------

FOR ITALIAN BREAD - Panettone
Add
2 teaspoons ground anise
1 tablespoon lemon rind
***
FOR GERMAN BREAD - Stollen
Add
2 teaspoons cardamom
1 tablespoon lemon rind
-------------------------------

FOR EACH LOAF
Add enough flour to make a soft dough
(about 1 to 1 1/2 cups). 

Turn out on a lightly floured surface and 
knead 15 minutes or 
until dough is smooth and elastic.

Put in a well-oiled bowl, turning the dough 
to coat it with oil.
Cover with a damp towel.
Let stand in a warm place away from drafts 
about 2 hours (until doubled in bulk).

Punch down the dough and turn out.
Cover with bowl and let rest 10 minutes.
-------------------------------
Shape 
Italian Panettonedough in a round loaf.
Place in deep round pan.
Cut an "X" in the top.
  
German  Stollendough into an oval 13 in. long, 1 in. thick 
and fold over one lengthwise half.
Lightly press edges together.
Pres the fold down firmly to prevent dough from
springing open during rising.
Place on greased cookie sheet.

Cover and let rise in a warm place about 1 hour.
----
Combine
1 egg yolk
1 tablespoon cold water
Brush over the loaves.
Bake 30 minutes or until brown.
-----
FOR GERMAN BREAD Stollen
Generously dust with sifted confectioner's sugar.

Monday, December 20, 2010

Mrs. Kekelia's Stollen, German Christmas Bread


A bread rich in eggs, sweet in butter and filled with fruit and nuts is always perfect for Christmas.

The Stollen form represents the Christ Child in swaddling clothes.  
The smell of Stollen made me feel right at home in College Point.

Hope it makes your guests feel welcome, too.
                     

                        Stollen

Grease 2 cookie sheets
Preheat oven to 325º 

Blanch, toast and chop
1 1/3 cups almonds
Reserve 1/3 cup almonds for topping.
Mix remaining almonds with
1 cup golden (or dark) raisins
1/2 cup currants
1 cup chopped citron
1 tablespoon grated lemon peel
Set aside.
----
Heat  to scalding
1 cup milk
Let it stand until it is lukewarm.
----
Pour into a warmed mixing bowl
1/2 cup warm water
Add
2 tablespoons active dry yeast
Stir until yeast is dissolved.
Set aside.
----
In a large mixing bowl put
1 cup butter (or margarine) softened
1 cup sugar
2 teaspoons salt
Add the milk and stir until butter is melted.
----
Add
1 cup flour
1 teaspoon nutmeg
Stir softened yeast and add.
----
Add 
3 cups flour
Beat until smooth.
----
Add, in thirds
3 large eggs, well beaten
Beat until smooth.
Add the reserved fruit-nut mixture.
Mix thoroughly.
Add enough flour to make a soft dough
(about 3 to 4 cups). 

Turn out on a lightly floured surface and
allow it to rest 10 minutes.

Knead until dough is smooth and elastic.
Put in an oiled bowl, turning the dough 
to coat it with oil.
Cover with waxed paper and a towel.
Let stand in a warm place away from drafts 
about 2 1/2 hours (until doubled in bulk).

Punch down the dough and turn dough over in bowl.
Cover with waxed paper and a towel and 
let rest 1 1/2 hours.

Punch down the dough and turn out
onto a lightly floured surface.
Divide into 2 portions and shape each 
into a smooth ball.
Allow dough to rest 10 minutes.

Shape dough into an oval 13 in. long and 1 in. thick 
and fold over one lengthwise half.
Lightly press edges together.
Pres the fold down firmly to prevent dough from
springing open during rising.
Repeat to form second oval.

Place one stollen on each greased sheet.
Brush tops with
Melted butter
Cover with waxed paper and let rise in a warm place 
about 1 1/2 hours.

Bake 30 minutes or until golden brown.
----
While baking prepare frosting by combining
1 1/2 cups sifted confectioner's sugar
3/4 teaspoon vanilla
Add gradually
2 to 3 tablespoons milk or cream
to make spreading consistency
----
Remove baked stollen to cooling racks.
Immediately spread frosting and
sprinkle reserved almonds over frosting.

A few finely cut candied cherries can also be added
to the almonds and sprinkled on top.

******
Some Moms didn't use icing but generously dusted the 
loaves with sifted confectioner's sugar.  
Powdery, but also good.

Aunt Betty's Panettone, Italian Christmas Bread

Strufoli does make a handsome - and fun - centerpiece.

But, to be honest, it doesn't have much of an scent, especially after it's been coated in honey.
Nope.  
To add that "Welcome home" feeling to a family get together, nothing beats the aroma of fresh from the oven bread.

And, at Christmas, nothing beats Panettone.

There's a legend about Panettone.  
It was created in Milan by a young nobleman named Antonio, who was in love with a baker's daughter.  
So he went to work for the baker, whose business was failing.  Antonio added butter, sugar, candied fruit and eggs to the bread dough.  
People loved the new creation - "Pane di Toni" or Tony's bread. 


                        Panettone

Grease a deep round pan
Preheat oven to 375º 

Heat  to scalding
1 cup milk
Let it stand until it is lukewarm.
----
In a small mixing bowl, beat until creamy
1/2 cup butter (or margarine) softened
1/2 cup sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
----
Pour into a warmed mixing bowl
1/4 cup warm water
Add
2 tablespoon active dry yeast
Stir until yeast is dissolved.
Add the milk and butter mixture and stir well.
----
Add
2 large eggs, beaten
2 cups flour
Beat until smooth.
----
Blend in
1/2 cup citron peel
1/4 cup seedless raisins
1/2 cup mixed, diced candied fruits
1/4 cup chopped toasted almonds
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
2 teaspoons ground anise
Add enough flour to make a soft dough
(about 2 cups). 

Turn out on a lightly floured surface and 
knead until dough is smooth and elastic.

Put in a well-oiled bowl, turning the dough 
to coat it with oil.
Cover with a damp towel.
Let stand in a warm place away from drafts 
about 1 1/2 hours (until doubled in bulk).

Punch down the dough and turn out.
Cover with bowl and let rest 10 minutes.
Shape dough in a round loaf and
place in greased round pan.
Cover and let rise in a warm place about 1 hour.
Cut an "X" in the top.
----
Combine
1 egg yolk
1 tablespoon cold water
Brush over the loaf.
Bake 1 hour or until brown.

****
The dough can also be baked in 3 1-pound coffee cans.
Bake at 400º, about 40 minutes.
Perfect for small gifts.

Sunday, December 19, 2010

Mrs. Kekelia's Zimtsterne, German Christmas Cookie



Zimtsterne

Beautiful.
Tasty.

What more could you want?

Cinnamon Stars.


Zimtsterne

lightly grease 2 cookie sheets          
preheat oven to 325º           
bake 15 to 18 min.

Grate and set aside
2 cups ( 2/3 lb.) unblanched almonds
(about 3 1/2 cups, grated)
----
Beat until stiff peaks are formed
3 egg whites
Add gradually, beating constantly
1 cup confectioner's sugar
Beat egg white-sugar mixture for 5 minutes 
with mixer on medium speed.
----
Blend in
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Set aside 1/2 cup of this meringue mixture.

Fold almonds into remaining meringue mixture.
Gently roll out 3/8 inch thick on cloth sprinkled 
with granulated sugar.
Lightly sprinkle the top of the dough with more sugar.
Cut out cookies with 2 to 2 1/2 inch cutter dipped
in confectioner's sugar.
Carefully place stars on cookie sheets.
Drop 1/2 teaspoon of the reserved meringue onto 
each cookie, drawing out onto points of the star.
Bake.

With a spatula immediately remove cookies to
cooling racks.

About 3 dozen cookies

Not Half, Not Ever - Being 60 (week 33 - by Margaret Ullrich)

Barbra Streisand once sang 
People who need people are the luckiest people in the world...  
You were half, now you're whole.

Bunk.

Don't get me wrong.
I love the holiday season.
It really is the time when we remember to be more human, more loving, more caring.

But, sometimes, it's a little unrealistic.

We're confronted with scenes of huge families gathered together and surrounded by hundreds of friends.

Scenes like the ending of It's a Wonderful Life.

If that reflects your life, I'm happy for you.
This is your time.

But, lots of people don't have a whole town's worth of friends.
Lots of us are lucky to have a half dozen good friends... or two.
And during most of the year, that's just fine.
But, it doesn't make for a hell of a movie finale.

No one is half.

And going on a desperate quest for the magical other can be dangerous.  
Some people, convinced they were half, have gotten into some really messy relationships.

Maybe we should just take a deep breath this month, slow down and take an honest look at how our lives are going.
If someone wants a broader social life, fine.  
Not because of a feeling of being a failure, of needing to be made complete.

Take what you've got and go with it.
If there are some rough edges, smooth them.
But, no desperation.

As the other great diva, Aretha Franklin, sang out R E S P E C T

Much better.

Saturday, December 18, 2010

Anna Sultana's Baccala alla Marinara, Baked Salt Cod, Maltese Style

Frying fish was not one of Ma's favorite things.  
Greasy, smelly and time consuming.

This is a healthier way to serve cod.  

Dried baccala soaked and prepared, can be cooked this way.
Or, you could use fresh or frozen cod.
Ma would.
I would.

And this recipe also makes use of some of those capers.


Baccala alla Marinara

Place in a casserole
2 pounds cod steaks, fresh or thawed
----
Combine in a saucepan
2 cups canned tomatoes, sieved
1/4 cup pitted and chopped green olives
2 tablespoons capers
1 tablespoon parsley
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 taspoon oregano
Bring to a boil and pour over cod.

Bake at 350º  25 to 30 minutes, until the fish flakes.

Stay healthy.

Carmela Soprano's Baccala Fritta (Fried Salt Cod)


Back in November I wrote a bit about an old fashioned Christmas Eve, Sicilian style, which featured The Feast of the Seven Fishes.

There are a lot of fish swimming in the sea.  
Something for every taste.
Lots of them land on the table on Christmas Eve.

Yes, well, along with the tasty fresh fish - and the eels - there was a dish that was included more for its sentimental value than its flavor.

Baccala.


If you've never seen Baccala up close, Monty Python's John Cleese compared it to a cricket bat.
That's about right.
A white, flat, slightly fish-shaped bat.
And about as hard and dry.

Now, Italians aren't crazy.
Nobody sits down to Baccala as is.  
Like anything old fashioned, it takes a bit of work to prepare.   


In the Holidays chapter in Carmela's Entertaining with The Sopranos, Carmela has a recipe for Baccala Fritta, Fried Salt Cod.

Yeah, right.

To be honest, I think she orders some in from some chi chi place in Little Italy in Lower Manhattan.  
I mean, Carm's way too busy, what with building houses on spec and having the hots for priests, mafia boys, repairmen, etc.  
Soaking dry cod?  Pul-lease....


Baccala Fritta is not something you can whip up at the last minute.

A couple of days before you want to cook it, place the baccala, cut into serving pieces, in a large bowl of cold water and refrigerate, changing the water at least 3 times a day for 2 days or more - until the water no longer tastes salty.  
Then you drain the baccala and dry it with paper towels.  
You can leave the baccala in the refrigerator for a day or 2 after it's desalted.

Or... you can use fresh or frozen cod fillets, thawed.
I do.


Baccala Fritta

For 1 1/2 pounds of prepared baccala:
Beat in a shallow bowl
4 large eggs
3 tablespoons flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
a dash of pepper
----
Place in another bowl
1 cup flour
----
Heat in a large skillet over medium heat
1/2 inch of olive oil
----
Coat a piece of fish with the flour.
Dip the fish in the batter, coating completely.
Repeat.

Fry the fish, a few pieces at a time, without crowding,
until golden brown (about 4 minutes) then turn and 
brown another 3 minutes.
Drain the fish on paper towels.

Serve hot with lemon wedges.

Would I make the Baccala Fritta again?
Nope.


Another recipe down.  Thirty-two more to go.

Friday, December 17, 2010

Mrs. Kekelia's Pfeffernuesse, German Christmas Cookie

Ah, Christmas in College Point.

Christmas Cookies in College Point.

Pfeffernuesse are nice and spicy and can be eaten two ways.
They're very hard when they are cooled. 
Great for dipping.
If you want to munch on something softer, store them in tightly covered containers with a piece of apple.


                        Pfeffernuesse

grease cookie sheets          
preheat oven to 350º           
bake 15 to 20 min., until lightly browned

Grate and set aside
1/2 cups ( 2 1/2 oz.) blanched almonds
----
Sift together into a bowl
4 cups flour
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/4 teaspoon mace
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Stir in the almonds and set aside.
----
Chop and set aside
3 oz. candied citron (about 1/2 cup, chopped)
----
Beat until thick and piled softly
4 eggs
Add gradually, beating thoroughly after each addition
2 cups sugar
----
add the flour-almond mixture in fourths,
blending thoroughly after each addition.
Mix in the citron.
Turn half the dough onto a lightly floured surface
and roll 1/2 inch thick.

Cut out cookies with a lightly floured 1 inch round cutter.
Carefully place cookies on cookie sheets.

Put a drop of
brandy
on the center of each cookie.
Bake.

Remove cookies to cooling racks.
Cool and store.

About 11 dozen cookies

Mrs. Kekelia's Anise Springerle, German Christmas Cookie


My classmates' Moms had some fascinating things in their kitchens.  I was amazed when I saw my first carved springerle rolling pin.

I'm not suggesting you go out and buy a springerle rolling pin.

This is the recipe for the dough.
I won't tell anyone if you use a regular cutter or slice the dough with a knife.

They taste good.

That should be enough for your guests.


                        Anise Springerle

grease cookie sheets          
preheat oven to 350º           
bake 30 min. until slightly browned

Sift together and set aside
4 1/2 cups sifted cake flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
----
Beat until thick and piled softly
4 eggs

Add
1/4 teaspoon oil of anise

Add gradually, beating thoroughly after each addition
3 1/2 cups sifted confectioner's sugar
4 teaspoons grated lemon peel
----
Beat in dry ingredients in fourths, mixing thoroughly.
Chill dough until firm enough to handle (about 1 hour).

Turn half the dough onto a lightly floured surface
and roll 1/2 inch thick.

Press lightly floured springerle rolling pin into dough
or use cookie cutter.
Brush surface gently to remove excess flour.
With a spatula, carefully place cookies on cookie sheets.
Cover with waxed paper and let them stand overnight.
Bake.

With a spatula, remove cookies at once to cooling racks.
When thoroughly cooled, store in a tightly covered jar 
for 1 or 2 weeks.
Storage develops flavor and consistency.
Cookies will keep for months.

About 2 1/2 dozen cookies

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Chop That Tree (part 4 - Margaret Ullrich)

We marched.  
Someone approved of another tree.  
The men chopped.  
The tree crashed.  
It broke.

God, it was cold. 

We were doomed to spend all day wandering like Flying Dutchmen on a quest to find the perfect unbreakable tree.  The lot was littered with other broken felled trees.  Some trees had landed across their comrades in a criss cross pattern that looked like a cradle.  A cradle, something soft, something to receive and hold... 

Hold it - something to catch a damn tree!
  

Nose drip and tears had frozen my mouth shut.  If I'd had the equipment I would've written my idea in the snow.  I slapped my face trying to restore circulation to my lower jaw.  Finally my lips parted.  I clutched Paul's arm.

"Cradle... tree... cradle," I mumbled and criss crossed my arms.  

The women thought I was pregnant and wanted a homemade cradle.  Thank God, months of marriage - misery and love - had united Paul's mind to mine.  Months of marriage had also taught us that Paul was no carpenter.  He knew the homemade cradle idea was bunk.  Paul caught on to my pantomime and told the others of my plan.  

Someone approved of another tree.  It would land on four broken trees.  The men chopped.  The tree crashed.  It survived.  We marched.  Someone approved of another tree.  It, too, survived.  

Christmas was saved. 

God, it was cold.

I didn't know it could get that cold.
I couldn't believe it.  
Some fool was planning the next year's tree chopping expedition.  

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Chop That Tree (part 3 - Margaret Ullrich)

God, it was cold.

I thought I had dressed warmly.  

That fink, the ditzy receptionist, showed up looking like the Michelin Man.  She was ready to march to Thompson if necessary.  So were the three other women co-workers.  The other wives - who all knew better - had begged off.  One was even pregnant.  Or said she was.

I was alone with four career women who were full of the "I am woman, hear me roar" career fever.  While they talked shop I felt as welcome as a lump of coal in a Christmas stocking. 

The Jewish co-workers - who I had hoped would keep the tree hunt frenzy within limits - had turned into lumberjacks.  They were also ready to march to Thompson if necessary.  

After walking five minutes I couldn't feel my toes.  
We hadn't even gotten out of the parking lot.  
I was doomed. 

I didn't know it could get that cold. 


We marched.  Finally, someone approved of a tree.  The men chopped.  The tree crashed.  The branches that hit the ground broke off the tree.  

I said, "The bare side could be placed against a wall."  

The heat from their glares should have restored my circulation.  
It didn't.

part 4

Aunt Betty's Strufoli, Italian Christmas Dessert



Forget the poinsettia.


Strufoli is way better as a holiday centerpiece.

Absolutely.

   
                   
  Strufoli

Makes about 150 strufoli (Don't bother counting)

Place in a large bowl
1/4 cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon 
Rub in
1 tablepoon margarine
----
Mix in
1 teaspoon vanilla
4 eggs
Add gradually
2 to 2 1/2 cups flour
Add just enough to make a smooth dough.
Let dough sit, covered, for 1/2 hour.
----
Roll out portions of the dough.  
Cut dough into strips.
Roll them a little so they'll be rounded instead 
of squared.  Cut in 1/4 inch pieces.
----
Heat about 2 1/2 inches oil to 365º.
Fry the dough, one layer deep, 3 to 5 minutes,
turning occasionally.
Cool on paper towels to absorb excess fat.
Place fried strufoli in a bowl.
----
In a saucepan heat over low heat about 5 minutes
1 cup honey
1 tablespoon sugar
Drizzle honey over strufoli and toss.
Chill slightly in refrigerator.
Arrange strufoli on large platter.
Sprinkle with 
tiny multicolored candies (confetti)

Some people also add 
2 tablespoons pine nuts
Eh....

Serve by breaking off pieces.
No knives!!


If you have a frying basket the frying is easier.
If not, don't worry.

Strufoli keeps for 2 weeks if stored in a closed container.