Sunday, July 7, 2019

Folklorama: Chicken Teriyaki and Bulkoki

Chicken Teriyaki 

Folklorama ’80 didn’t just give us a chance to learn about European countries, such as Great Britain, Ireland, the Ukraine, and Scandinavia.
We were also able to explore a bit of Asia.
Two very popular pavilions were the Japan Pavilion and the Seoul Pavilion.


The Japan Pavilion, hosted by the Japanese Canadian Citizens’ Association, was presented at Sargent Park Arena.
The program said: 
Japan - the land of sake and geisha girls.

There were young women in beautiful outfits and sake was readily available.
The menu included Japanese rice cakes (an exotic item at the time), tempura, chicken teriyaki, accompanied by Suntory (Japanese whiskey), and umeshu (Japanese wine).
The entertainment included Ondes (folk dancing), martial arts demonstrations, Ikebana (flower arranging) and Chanyo (the tea ceremony).

The audience has often been invited to join in the folk dancing.
Over the years they also had a very energetic drumming group.
The martial arts drew young men, while the tea ceremony was for patient folks.
The pavilion has always been a favourite, with lots to see, do and eat.
      

The Seoul Pavilion was set up at Chalmers Community Centre.
The Korean Association of Manitoba said: 
Enjoy the warm-hearted hospitality of the Korean people who invite you to share in their ancient heritage.
The heritage was shared by the displays of handicrafts, brush paintings, and ceramics, the Tae-Kwon-Do demonstrations, and the music provided by a Korean Choir.
The menu included Bul-ko-ki (Korean Barbecued Beef) and Man-Duo (Korean Perogie).

Both pavilions have been popular annual draws and are back for Folklorama50.
The Japan Pavilion now calls itself the Japanese Pavilion, while the Seoul Pavilion is the Korean Pavilion in the new program.


Hints:

The chicken for the teriyaki can also be boned and skinned, then cut into chunks and marinated. Then it can be skewered alternately with pieces of Spanish onion and broiled or barbecued.

Beef, pork or fish can also be marinated in the teriyaki mixture.
Thinly sliced meat can be marinated, then fried in butter in an electric skillet at the table and served hot from the pan. 


                        Chicken Teriyaki 

Combine in a large bowl
1 teaspoon sugar
1 clove garlic, crushed (optional)
3 Tablespoons sake, or other wine
3 Tablespoons shoyu
1/2 inch cube green ginger, grated finely (optional)

Cut into bite-size pieces
3 pounds frying chicken
Place the chicken pieces in the marinade, cover and let sit for several hours in the refrigerator.

Broil or barbecue the chicken over an open fire, using whatever sauce remains to brush on as required.


                        Bul-ko-ki 

Serves 4

Combine in a large bowl
!/2 Cup soy sauce
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons sesame seed oil
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
4 piece green onion, chopped
1/2 carrot, finely sliced
Stir until well mixed.

Cut into thin slices
2 pounds beef tenderloin or sirloin

Place the beef slices in the marinade, cover and let sit for 6 hours in the refrigerator, turning the slices every 2 hours.

Preheat oven to 500º F with the broiler on.
Place the meat in a large shallow roasting pan and put it on the upper oven rack.
After about 3 minutes turn the slices over and let cook 2 minutes longer.
Serve immediately with boiled or steamed rice.

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